Psyched for Romance

Sports Romance & Romantic Suspense With a Psychological Twist

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Breathe.

How have you felt since the Boston Marathon terrorist attack?

I've felt horror, disgust, rage, and sadness. Right now I feel numb.

And this is from miles away. I can't imagine how I would feel if I'd been on ground zero, witnessing the carnage.

But I can imagine what it's like to face trauma such as rape, abuse, accidents, and crime. I hear it from my psychotherapy clients all too often.

Survivors of trauma like bombings or abuse may develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, a clinical syndrome I detail HERE in my Psycho Author series. Quite a few of my characters have struggled to heal from PTSD.

What's a simple tool to help anyone who's endured a traumatic event? BREATHE.

When we get scared, our breathing changes, becoming quicker and shallower, or stopping for a moment. Such changes only serve to increase our panic and tension.

Simply paying attention to our breath can help calm us when we're feeling stressed. But deep breathing, aka diaphragmatic breathing or belly breathing, is even more helpful.

1) Take a few moments to notice your breath. Breathe in through your nose and out your mouth. Let your body's natural rhythm of breathing gently become slower and deeper, but still easy and relaxed.

2) Let that breath go deep into your belly. Place one hand on your chest and one hand on your belly (below your belly button). Keep the hand on your chest still, while pushing out the hand on your belly with air.

3) The diaphragm is the muscle lining beneath your lungs. Feel the diaphragm push down as you inhale.


I hope that noticing your breath helps you deal with the multitude of feelings from the Boston Marathon or other traumatic events.

3 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Control our breathing, control our fear.

DarcĂ­a Helle said...

Excellent advice, Jen. We often forget the simple power of our breath.

I'm from Massachusetts, just south of Boston. A good friend of mine was at the marathon that morning with her family. She'd left the area only 20 minutes before the bombs went off. Scary how life can change in the blink of an eye.

Nicki Elson said...

The power of breathing. I've been a believer since I did Lamaze classes before my daughter was born - I saw how it helped me manage both pain & panic (but only until the doctor could get some proper drugs in me, heh) and it's helped me through many other things since.

I've tagged you with an award thingy at my place. :) No pressure to follow up on it, but I'd love to read your answers.

 


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